New Romana Website

Romana, the bulletin of the Prelature of the Holy Cross and Opus Dei that is published twice a year, has redesigned its website, making it more user-friendly.

Opus Dei - New Romana Website

The Romana website, created in 2000, has been updated to give priority to ease of reading and intuitive access to the various sections of the bulletin. It has also been made more user-friendly for mobile phones, tablets and laptops.

The website is available in the three languages in which the bulletin is published: Spanish, Italian and English.

The website now offers easy and quick access to the digital archive, where previous volumes can be accessed. The website is available in the three languages in which the bulletin is published: Spanish, Italian and English. The content it offers is free, but not everything contained in the printed edition is available on the website.

Romana publishes, both in its printed version and in its digital edition, documents of the Holy See addressed to the whole Church, as well as texts specifically referring to Opus Dei, and informs about the activity of the Prelate and the Prelature at the service of the universal Church and the particular Churches. Its pages also provide news about some apostolic initiatives organized by the faithful of the Prelature in the sphere of civil society and their professional work, with the aim of imbuing temporal realities with a Christian spirit.

The information included in Romana does not aim to give a complete picture of the Prelature's activities, since Opus Dei's fundamental apostolate is that which is carried out by each of its faithful, with the spiritual assistance they receive from the Prelature. This varied and spontaneous apostolate, carried out in the context of each one's professional, social and family occupations, goes far beyond any attempt at systematization or statistical analysis.

The publication of the bulletin fulfills a desire of Saint Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer who, in choosing the Roman title for the future bulletin, wanted to underscore the Catholic, universal character of Opus Dei's own pastoral mission.